design

The Artisan Coffee Table Pt. 2 – Ideas and Concepts

The Artisan Coffee Table Pt. 2 – Ideas and Concepts

I took the design I sketched to my wife for her approval. She okayed it but didn’t seem too enthused, so I took my time looking up various other designs. The mid-century modern coffee table designs seemed to fall in one of two camps, either a table with skewed and tapered legs and thin top, or a box shaped carcase on smaller legs. The wife seemed a lot more enthusiastic about the latter, so the overall design theme for the Artisan coffee table was settled.

When designing a piece of furniture, the overall design of the piece needs to be based on it’s setting. In this case, the coffee table would be seen and used mostly against our living room couch, so I set the basic dimensions based on the couch. When sketching my piece I like to sketch the key aspects of the environment to scale to be able to visualise roughly how it’ll look.

Mid-century modern coffee table, couch

Sketching the key furniture that the table will be viewed against – the couch

Most mid-century modern coffee tables I came across on the internet with box-shaped carcases looked rather disproportional to me – they either had legs that were too long, or stretchers that were too long or short, ruining the visual relationship between the top and the base. I decided to go with the golden ratio to establish the dimensions between the top and the base, both for the length and the depth. The other key aspect to this sort of a design is the angle of skew and taper on the legs. I tried out a few different angles before settling on my final design.

Mid century modern, artisan, walnut

Walnut lumber for the Artisan coffee table – and my cat

I left off last post at the lumber purchasing stage – it just so happened that I came across someone selling a pretty large amount of lumber on Kijiji (a Canadian craigslist of sorts), and the bulk of the wood was walnut. I picked out a few pieces based on grain and colour similarities and stickered them to allow the wood to acclimatise to my home. I’ve overlooked this step in the past and kicked myself for it later on. With the wood left to sticker, it gave me some more time to settle the finer details of the design.

Posted by Prairie Artisan Woodshop in Artisan Coffee Table, Builds, 0 comments